Cities of the Symbiocene: Relational Energy Literacy as Spatial Praxis

Cities of the Symbiocene:

Guest lecture by Dr. Derek Gladwin (UBC) organized by the ASCA Cities Project on Friday 1 Nov., 3-5pm, in the Potgieterzaal, University Library (Singel 425, Amsterdam).

A 2016 Report from the World Energy Council titled “Innovating Urban Energy” predicts that by 2030 the global footprint will triple in urban areas. Without an understanding of the spatial effects of energy use and demand, urban populations cannot fully engage in the development of better practices and policies to create a just society. Consequently, there is an urgent need to address the ways cities might produce knowledge about their energy use, impact, and relationships. When building energy literacy and the link to urban infrastructures, assemblages, and power structures, we are also speaking about relationality – to each other, to systems, to societies, and to the spaces we inhabit – and the ways we produce and are produced by space. This talk considers a relational paradigm applied to the spatial dynamics of energy cultures in the Symbiocene – shifting the dominant paradigm from reductive individualism to a relational model of social symbiosis and aesthetic practice.

Dr. Derek Gladwin is an Assistant Professor of Language & Literacy Education and a Sustainability Fellow with the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. His interdisciplinary research and teaching focus on transformations in society and culture through environmental humanities, energy literacy, and sustainability education. He has held visiting fellowships at Concordia University (Montréal), National University of Ireland, Galway, University of Edinburgh, and Trinity College Dublin. He is the author, editor, or co-editor of six books and special journal issues, including Contentious Terrains (2016), Ecological Exile (2018), and Gastro-Modernism (2019), and is currently working on a book titled Energy Literacy: Narrating Transitions and Futures.

Preparatory reading/viewing:
Albrecht, Glenn. “Exiting the Anthropocene and Entering the Symbiocene.” Minding Nature 9.2 (2016): 12-16.
Broto, Vanesa Castán and Baker, Lucy. “Spatial Adventures in Energy Studies.” Energy Research & Social Science 36 (2018): 1-10. [Note: focus on sections 1-2]
Skawennati. She Falls for Ages. Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace. Montreal: Obx Labs, 2018. Please watch this film (21 min.): see www.skawennati.com/SheFallsForAges/

The texts can be accessed via: www.dropbox.com/sh/czvtz54cssq95xl/AADgQG28toT-nI8IIX_Tlffma?dl=0

Power and Politics in Contemporary Culture and Media

Power and Politics in Contemporary Culture and Media

Power and Politics in Contemporary Culture and Media

Master class with with Dr. Shelley Cobb (University of Southampton) and Dr. Neil Ewen (University of Winchester)

P.C. Hoofthuis, room 6.25, Spuistraat 134, Amsterdam | Thursday November 7, 2019, 13:00-17:00

Open to all RMA and PhD students. Register by sending a mail with a project/thesis description and your cv to gaston.franssen@uva.nl. Due to room size, the number of available spots is limited.

ASCA and NICA are proud to welcome dr. Shelley Cobb (University of Southampton) and dr. Neil Ewen (University of Winchester) for a special two-day visit to the University of Amsterdam. On Friday November 8, they will be the main speakers of a public symposium on Public Intellectuals: Celebrity, Advocacy, Activism (13-17 hrs., VOC-zaal, Bushuis, Kloveniersburgwal 48); on Thursday November 7, they will be leading a RMA/PhD masterclass, during which they will share their expertise in research into power and politics in contemporary culture and media with a select group of RMA/PhD students.

RMA/PhD students whose current research touches upon this topic and who want to seize the opportunity to receive feedback from two international experts in this field are therefore invited to present their current project during this unique masterclass. Presentations take the form of 15 minutes research pitches, and will be followed by intensive discussion with and feedback by Dr. Cobb and Dr. Ewen and other presenters. Please note: due to room size, the number of available spots is limited.

All interested in taking part are requested to sign up for the masterclass by sending an email with their project description and cv to gaston.franssen@uva.nl before November 4.

Shelley Cobb is an Associate Professor of Film at the University of Southampton. Her main areas of research and teaching expertise are in women and film (both production and representation), gender and popular culture, celebrity studies and adaptation. Her monograph Adaptation, Authorship and Contemporary Women Filmmakers (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) considers film adaptations directed by women that foreground the figure of the female author. She is also co-editor (with Neil Ewen) of First Comes Love: Power Couples, Celebrity Kinship and Cultural Politics (Bloomsbury, 2015).

Neil Ewen is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at the Department of School of Media and Film, University of Winchester. His research interests lie in the politics of contemporary media and culture. From a critical media and cultural studies perspective, he writes about celebrity, sport, politics and politicians, film, television, and journalism. He is the co-editor (with Shelley Cobb) of First Comes Love: Power Couples, Celebrity Kinship and Cultural Politics (Bloomsbury, 2015) and Capitalism, Crime and Media in the 21st Century (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2020).

Public Intellectuals: Celebrity, Advocacy, Activism

Public Intellectuals: Celebrity, Advocacy, Activism

ASCA/NICA Symposium organized by Gaston Franssen on Friday November 8, 2019, 13:00-17:00

Public Intellectuals: Celebrity, Advocacy, Activism

VOC-zaal, Bushuis, Kloveniersburgwal 48, Amsterdam

Open to all students and staff members. Register by sending a mail to nica-fgw@uva.nl. Please mention your affiliation.

Cultural critics have been bemoaning the decline of the public intellectual at least since 1987 when Russell Jacoby published the book The Last Intellectuals: American Culture in the Age of Academe. Through Richard Posner’s 2003 Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline to Stefan Collini’s 2006 Absent Minds: Intellectuals in Britain and recently McKenzie Wark’s 2017 General Intellects: Twenty-Five Thinkers for the Twenty-First Century this narrative of the loss or decline of the public intellectual continues to dominate the discussion, putting the blame on the intensification of specialization in the academy and the increasing celebrification of public figures. This symposium seeks to intervene in this narrative of loss and decline by analyzing contemporary intellectuals who maintain a public profile in the media (traditional and/or new), while constructing and negotiating their public image in different ways. This symposium, then, starts out from the conviction that the public intellectual on the one hand and the culture of celebrity and mass media on the other hand are not at odds with each other. Rather, these speakers accept that contemporary public intellectuals, whether they want to or not, must navigate the pressures and politics of media culture; and analyzing their navigational trajectories, moreover, is essential to truly understand the roles they play in public life and their impact on current debates.

13:00 Dr. Gaston Franssen (University of Amsterdam): Welcome & Introduction

13:10 Panel: dr. Shelley Cobb (University of Southampton) &
dr. Neil Ewen (University of Winchester): The Celebrity, Micro-Celebrity and Anti-Celebrity of Contemporary Public Intellectuals in the New Attention Economy

14:15 Dr. Inge van de Ven (Tilburg University): Attention Seekers: Female Public Intellectuals in the Selfie Age

15:00 coffee/thee

15:15 Prof. Dr. Odile Heynders (Tilburg University): The Public Intellectual on Stage: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

16:00 Prof. Dr. Misha Kavka (University of Amsterdam) & Emma Blackett (University of Auckland, MA): Trump’s Women

16:45 Panel discussion + Q&A

17:15 Drinks

Shelley Cobb is an Associate Professor of Film at the University of Southampton. Her main areas of research and teaching expertise are in women and film (both production and representation), gender and popular culture, celebrity studies and adaptation. Her monograph Adaptation, Authorship and Contemporary Women Filmmakers (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) considers film adaptations directed by women that foreground the figure of the female author. She is also co-editor (with Neil Ewen) of First Comes Love: Power Couples, Celebrity Kinship and Cultural Politics (Bloomsbury, 2015).

Neil Ewen is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at the Department of School of Media and Film, University of Winchester. His research interests lie in the politics of contemporary media and culture. From a critical media and cultural studies perspective, he writes about celebrity, sport, politics and politicians, film, television, and journalism. He is the co-editor (with Shelley Cobb) of First Comes Love: Power Couples, Celebrity Kinship and Cultural Politics (Bloomsbury, 2015) and Capitalism, Crime and Media in the 21st Century (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2020).

Odile Heynders is Professor of Comparative Literature and Head of the Department of Culture Studies at Tilburg University. She has published numerous books and articles on European literature and authorship. Her book Writers as Public Intellectuals, Literature, Celebrity, Democracy (2016) appeared at Palgrave McMillan. Her current research (book) project is on Experiences of Migration in Literature (book contract Cambridge Publishers).

Misha Kavka is Professor of Cross-Media Culture at the Media Studies Department, University of Amsterdam. Her main areas of research are film , (reality) television, and the affective relations that underpin celebrity culture. Her publications include Reality Matters: Affect and Intimacy in Reality Television (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) and Reality Television (Edinburgh University Press, 2012).

Inge van de Ven is Assistant Professor of Online Culture in the Department of Culture Studies at Tilburg School of Humanities & Digital Sciences, Tilburg University. She is interested in contemporary literature in relation to new media, and everything to do with attention. She has published in Image & Narrative, Journal of Creative Behavior, and Narrative. Her monograph Big Books in times of Big Data will be published in 2019 with Leiden University Press.

Decolonizing & Indigenizing Justice: Confronting Colonial Injustice in an “Age of Reconciliation”?

NICA Masterclass with Patricia Barkaskas (Instructor & Director Indigenous Community Legal Clinic, University of British Columbia)

For: (research) master students / PhD candidates

Date: Friday, November 1, 2019
Time: 10:00-12:00
Location: University Library (Potgieterzaal), Singel 425, Amsterdam
Registration: nica-fgw@uva.nl
Contact: C.J.Birdsall@uva.nl

Participants can earn 1 EC by attending, preparation of the reading and active participation.

While much academic and public discourse since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) Final Report has and continues to emphasize reconciliation, there is also deep skepticism about a process of reconciling that so readily glosses over truth-telling about the history of genocide in Canada. More recently, the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls found “human rights and Indigenous rights abuses committed and condoned by the Canadian state represent genocide against Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people.” This truth disrupts the notion that we have entered an “Age of Reconciliation” and challenges us to consider how we will meaningful address the ongoing colonial project in Canada and reframe reconciliation to consider meaningful justice for Indigenous peoples, communities – urban, rural, and reserve – and Nations.

Grounded in the work of experiential teaching and learning about justice utilizing decolonial and Indigenous methodology and pedagogy at the Indigenous Community Legal Clinic, located in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh), and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations, this masterclass considers questions connected to the project of a decolonial resistance pedagogy, and its significance in Canada for the project of decolonizing and Indigenizing justice.

Required Reading:

-Barkaskas, Patricia and Buhler, Sarah. “Beyond Reconciliation: Decolonizing Clinical Legal Education.” Journal of Law and Social Policy 26. (2017): 1-20.

-Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada – Calls to Action (https://nctr.ca/assets/reports/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf).

-National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls – Calls for Justice (https://www.mmiwg-ffada.ca/).

Bio:

Patricia M. Barkaskas is Métis from Alberta. Her research focuses on the intersection of justice and law, including access to justice, clinical legal education, and decolonizing and Indigenizing law. She is particularly interested in examining the value of Indigenous pedagogies in experiential learning, clinical legal education, and skills-based legal training, and disrupting the normative violence of colonial legal education.

Patricia is the Director of the Indigenous Community Legal Clinic, which is located in the Downtown Eastside community of Vancouver on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and sə̓lílwətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. The ICLC welcomes up to thirty law students a year who provide free legal services to the Indigenous community in the Lower Mainland and throughout the province.  Students are taught through hands-on experience conducting legal work on client files, including legal research, submissions, and court appearances. Professor Barkaskas is also faculty lead for the law school’s Indigenous Cultural Competency Certificate, launched in September 2018. The ICCC is an eight-month non-credit certificate course that assists students in developing better understandings of colonial assumptions, beliefs, and biases that form the foundation of the Canadian legal system, the history of colonial practices and policies in Canada, Indigenous perspectives on law, and what decolonization means for the practice of law.

Before attending law school, Professor Barkaskas earned a M.A. in History, with a focus on Indigenous histories in North America, and worked for Residential school survivors as an historical legal researcher for the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. As part of her J.D., she completed a Law and Social Justice Specialization. After receiving her law degree from UBC, she practiced in the areas of child protection (as parent’s counsel), criminal, family, civil litigation, and prison law. She has written Gladue reports for all levels of court in BC.