The Politics of Translation and Adaptation

Film and Literary Studies | LUCAS @ Leiden University invites you to: Two 20 Minute Lectures on African Theatre!
Thursday 6 December, 16:00-18:00 in Lipsius 148, Leiden

Dr. Paulina Aroch Fugellie
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico City

“Shakespeare, Nyerere and the Politics of Translation”
This lecture explores Mabepari wa Venisi (1969), a Swahili translation of William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice by Julius Nyerere, Tanzania’s first independent president. Shifting attention from the all too frequent reduction of African literature to its thematic interest, Aroch Fugellie claims that politics inhers in Nyerere’s adroit and complex handling of form. Nyerere’s “migratory cliches” produce meaning by engaging with the context of reception, with his own political writings, and with the Elizabethan play itself.

Dr. Sola Adeyemi
Goldsmiths University, London

“Negotiating the Landscape of Postcolony through a Spectral Frame”
This lecture explores the issue of “authenticity” in recuperating traditional performance culture among the Yoruba of West Africa, in particular the Egúngún – masquerades – masks, and using the narratives to translate and adapt Western literature for the African audience. Adeyemi locates the interrogation of the postcolony in the dramatic interpretation that questions the encounter between the African orature and Western literature

ROSANNA Fund

The DEADLINE for the ROSANNA Fund Scholarship applications is coming up: December the 1st, 2018!

The ROSANNA Fund supports talented and disadvantaged women students and researchers who intend to build their careers at Utrecht University. The fund offers women students and researchers financial support to help them achieve academic success. The ROSANNA Fund wishes to make higher education more accessible to women, so that no female researcher has to be excluded because of limited financial means.

Interested in applying for a scholarship? The ROSANNA Fund offers short-term scholarships between € 2.500 and € 5.000. The awarded amount depends on the candidate’s financial situation, academic record, and feasibility of the plans. A ROSANNA Fund scholarship can differ for each candidate, depending on the specific needs of the candidate in question. For more information, please visit our website or send an e-mail.

https://www.uu.nl/en/organisation/alumni/contribute/contribute-to-an-existing-named-fund/rosanna-fund

With best wishes, Prof. Rosi Braidotti and Prof. Anneke Smelik

Graduate School of North American Studies Freie Universitat Berlin offers Doctoral Grants

Application Procedure

Applications for doctoral grants (funded by the DFG or DAAD-GSSP) and doctoral memberships (Promotionsplätze) for candidates with third-party funding for the academic year 2019 can now be submitted via our application platform. Applicants will have to upload the documents listed below and can either prepare their application dossiers offline or (in several steps) online. Please note that only projects related to the field of North American Studies can be considered (i.e. the dissertation has to relate to the U.S. and/or Canada). We will be glad to answer any further questions via email.
The deadline for applications is November 30, 2018.

The following documents will have to be included in the online application. You will find all relevant details on the specificities (length, file size, etc,) of the documents listed below after registering on our application platform. We therefore kindly ask you to refrain from inquiries on application documents before accessing the online application form.
You can revise your application before submitting the complete application dossier and hence complete the application process in several steps. Please note that the referees who are supposed to submit a reference letter will not be informed before the application has been submitted. Deadline for the upload of reference letters is December 15, 2018.

  1. Curriculum Vitae (in English)
  2. Statement of Purpose of approx. 2 pages (in English)
  3. Copies of Earned Degrees/Diplomas/Graduation Certificates (High School, BA, MA, etc.)
    Please note: Applicants who have not obtained their MA/MSc degree by the deadline must provide a transcript of records specifying that the coursework for the master’s degree has been completed. In addition, applicants must provide a written confirmation that the MA/MSc thesis has been submitted. The final grade of the MA thesis/program must be sent to the attention of the GSNAS office before the interviews. The official diploma for the final degree (MA, MSc) must be submitted no later than May 31, 2019 in order to ensure the admission by the respective school/department (Fachbereich).
  4. An Outline of the Dissertation Project of 8-10 pages (in English)
  5. work plan/timeline (in English)
  6. Writing Sample based on a chapter of the M.A. thesis or an already published journal article (in English or German)
  7. Proof of Language Proficiency (TOEFL, IELTS, CAS, CPE)
    All applicants who are neither native English speakers nor have earned a degree at a university with English as language of instruction are required to submit certification of their English proficiency: minimum TOEFL scores of 600 (paper-based), 250 (computer-based) and 100 (internet-based) or equivalent minimum CAE (A and B), CPE (A, B, C) or IELTS (7.0) scores. A degree in North American Studies or English Language and Literature, earned at a German university is not sufficient as a proof of English language skills. It will only be accepted if the entire curriculum was taught in English. In addition, stays/semesters abroad will not be accepted as a substitute for a language test.
  8. Two Recent Letters of Reference (to be uploaded separately by the respective referee until Dec 15, 2018)

See: http://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/en/graduateschool/application/application_forms/index.html

The Academy and the Idea of Decolonisation

Masterclass and Lecture by Toyin Falola (University of Texas)

The aim of this workshop is to revisit the state of the art on theories of decolonisation of mind and knowledge. More information to be announced soon.

Date: 10 December 2018
Time: 10:00-12:30 (masterclass) & 14:00-17:00 (keynote lecture and discussion)
Venue: Amsterdam, Bushuis (VOC-zaal) & University Library (Doelenzaal)
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS (for PhD and RMa students only)
Coordination: Larissa Schulte Nordholt (Leiden University) and Marleen Reichgelt (Radboud University Nijmegen)
Maximum participants in this event: 20
Registration (before 1 November 2018)

NOTE: separate registration for masterclass and keynote
(A list of required readings and information about the assignment will be sent to the admitted participants in the course of November.)

One day masterclass: The Academy and the Idea of Decolonisation

It has been argued that the academic system of knowledge production—as we have known it since the Age of Imperialism/the Enlightenment—is fundamentally Western, wherein the west assumes the status of the “universal”. Although many former colonies around the world (Asia, Africa and Latin America) received political freedom in the second half of the twentieth century, the dominant mode of knowledge production and critical thinking within the academy was, and still is, largely determined by a western white male perception. Although universities worldwide are able to flourish to some extent, it remains difficult to truly escape from a normative western hegemony on the system of knowledge production and academic research.

The dominance of these thought-patterns originating in the west was never completely unchallenged and gained momentum from the second half of the twentieth century onwards through anticolonial and postcolonial critique, feminist discourse and the emergence of global intellectual history. The new tide of such critical thinking questioned Eurocentric approaches in history, philosophy and anthropology, among others, and argued in favour of a decolonisation of (academic) knowledge production. As a result the humanities have been enriched by crucial debates regarding the place of ‘Europe’ within Academic research as a whole.

To apply the insights from these debates to one’s research, however, can be a challenging feat – both on a theoretical and a practical level. The Huizinga masterclass ‘The Academy and the idea of Decolonisation’ aims to revisit the state of the art on theories of decolonisation of academic research. The plenary keynote lecture  will reflect on the state of the (historical) academy regarding the ‘Idea of Decolonisation’ and raise the question what it means to attempt a ‘Decolonisation of Knowledge’. Is there one Decolonisation or multiple Decolonisations? Is Decolonisation within the academy a monolithic concept or are there multiple layers within this broader academic issue? Most importantly, has knowledge been decolonised at all or is a culture of recolonisation replacing older thought patterns? Through the lecture and the input by local respondents we hope to be able to create an atmosphere in which there will be space for both conceptual in-depth questions and more practical concerns regarding the ‘Idea of Decolonisation’.

The workshop  is dedicated to critically engaging with the above-mentioned questions on a more practical level. Junior researchers will be given the chance to engage with questions concerning mental decolonization as they pertain to their own research projects. The goal is to inform students and researchers of cultural history about ongoing debates on Decolonisation and knowledge production from a global intellectual perspective.

Both the masterclass and the keynote lecture are given by Toyin Falola (1953). Prof. Dr. Falola is a Nigerian historian of Africa who currently holds the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair Professor in the Humanities and a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Falola, who took his PhD-degree at the university of Ile-Ife in Nigeria, is a prolific scholar on African history from the 19th century onwards. He has written both local histories, focusing on Yoruba history in Nigeria, and more globally oriented accounts on the histories of Africa as a whole. Moreover, he has taught and written extensively on African intellectual history and the emergence of the field of African and Black studies, focusing on its pedagogies, methodologies and epistemologies.

Research Master’s Seminar: “Imagining the Image” (VU University)

When? February – June 2019
Where? VU University, TBA
For? RMa Students
Credits? 9 ECTS
Coordinator? dr Sven Lutticken (VU University)
Registration? Please send a short motivation before 16 November 2018, to s.lutticken[at]vu.nl and c.c. to RMeS-fgw[at]uva.nl. Please be sure to specify your master programme, national research school and university.

This course examines different conceptualizations of the image in the context of historical transformations of the arts. This year’s edition will focus on critical theories of representation and visibility, including not only art and media theory but also in philosophy, feminist theory and postcolonial studies. Looking into representation both in the sense of depiction (Darstellung) and of political delegation (Vertretung), we will discuss the multiple valences, ambiguous past and uncertain future of this concept. Contemporary artistic and activist practices will be analysed in conjunction with the theoretical writings.

Participants in this course will:
1) analyse and compare relevant theories of the image in art history, media studies, design studies and the history of architecture.
2) actively apply theories to selected case studies.
3) examine the historicity of theories of the image and the potential contemporary relevance of older writings.
4) reflect on the wider social and cultural relevance of various conceptualizations of the image and visibility.

Lecture and seminar. The focus is on active participation and the ability to articulate and discuss one’s analysis.

Students write an essay that counts for 60% of the final grade; presentations during class (30%) and participation in the discussions (10%) make up the remaining 40%. Students are expected to be able to discuss and critique theoretical texts at a high level of sophistication.

Matching of course objectives and assessment
Objective 1: Discussion about readings (10%), presentation (30%)
Objective 2: Essay, 3000 words (60%)
Objective 3: Discussion, presentation, essay
Objective 4: Discussion

Literature

To be announced

Admission

Admission to Research Master’s programme Critical Studies in Art and Culture. Students from other tracks in the Humanities Research Master, and students from comparable research master’s programmes elsewhere, may be admitted individually, depending on their background knowledge.
To register: Please send a short motivation to s.lutticken[at]vu.nl and c.c. to RMeS-fgw[at]uva.nl. Please be sure to specify your master programme, national research school and university.