Posthuman Knowledge(s)

Utrecht Summer School course by Prof. Rosi Braidotti
August 19-23, 2019

In 2019, Braidotti’s intensive course will focus on “Posthuman Knowledge(s)”. The aim of the course is to offer a critical overview of contemporary debates about the implications of the ‘posthuman turn’, for knowledge production and research in the Posthumanities. Braidotti will apply her specific brand of critical feminist posthuman theory to the analysis of fast-growing fields such as the Environmental and Digital Humanities, asking questions such as: what is the subject of the Posthumanities? How do these new fields of knowledge affect the constitution of subjectivity and the practice of the academic (post) humanities today? How can posthuman knowledge assist us in moving beyond the patterns of exclusion of the sexualized, racialized and naturalized “others” that were excluded from humanity and disqualified as subjects of knowledge? How can we learn to think beyond anthropocentrism?

Register now on www.utrechtsummerschool.nl.
Registration deadline: June 1, 2019.
Course fee: €300. Housing fee (optional): €200.

Please note that all participants of this summer school are expected to have read several selected entries of Rosi Braidotti’s Posthuman Knowledge (forthcoming, Polity 2019).

For more information, contact gw.braidottiass@uu.nl.

FLYER: Detailed Programme Braidotti Summer School 2019 Flyer

 

Racial Orders, Racist Borders

Racial Orders, Racist Borders

Call for Papers: Sixth Annual ACGS Conference, 17-18 October 2019, University of Amsterdam.

Around the world, racist discourses, attitudes, and practices have moved from the fringes into the mainstream, putting core democratic values under pressure. Familiar racial orders have resurfaced and reinforced racist borders, both metaphorical and material. The sixth annual conference of the Amsterdam Centre for Globalisation Studies (ACGS) invites papers that examine how forms, discourses and practices of racism have materialized in various institutional contexts.

Keynote speakers:

Gargi Bhattacharyya (University of East London, UK) is a Professor of Sociology at the UEL’s Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging and the author, most recently, of Rethinking Racial Capitalism: Questions of Reproduction and Survival (2018).

Barnor Hesse (Northwestern University, Evanston, USA) is an Associate Professor of African American Studies, Political Science and Sociology and the co-editor, most recently, of After #Ferguson, After #Baltimore: The Challenge of Black Death and Black Life for Black Political Thought (2017, with Juliet Hooker).

David Lloyd (University of California, Riverside, USA) is Distinguished Professor of English and the author, most recently, of Under Representation: The Racial Regime of Aesthetics (2018).

Organized in cooperation with the collaborative research centre Dynamics of Security at the Universities of Giessen and Marburg, Germany, the conference’s main conceptual focus is on the institutional dimensions of racism. How and by whom has racism been ‘mainstreamed’ in different countries and regions around the globe? What kinds of discourses, techniques, strategies and tactics have been mobilized to mainstream racism? And how does this take shape in diverse institutional settings, including politics, education, international institutions, the media, cultural foundations, the police, and the legal system? In the wake of unrestrained, state-led xenophobia and populist nationalism, the function of race as a building block of culture, education, finance, nationalism and democracy can no longer be dissolved into ethnicity, nationalism and religion. Thus, the function of race cannot be hidden behind modernity, the Enlightenment, multiculturalism or civilization, deferred to the histories of ‘other’ places and ‘other’ peoples, or relegated to a past that was ostensibly erased with the end of the Holocaust and the birth of modern institutions such as the European Union and the United Nations. We need to employ the full range of research tools and approaches to take stock of how race and racism have continued to underscore state histories and institutions, as well as everyday practices, habits, gestures, affects, languages, aesthetics and representations alike.

Avenues of inquiry may include, but are not limited to:

  • Histories of institutional racism
  • Racism and populist governance
  • Intersectional perspectives on race and racism
  • Intersections between different practices of racism
  • Whiteness
  • Racism and #metoo
  • Racism and social media
  • Race, immigration and refugee flows
  • Race (and) wars
  • Borders and bodies
  • Race, racism and the digital
  • Race and technology
  • Legalizing race and racism
  • Teaching race and racism
  • Race, policing and profiling
  • Globalization and neoliberalism
  • Nationalism and the nation-state
  • Race and popular media
  • Fake news and the crisis of journalism
  • Multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism
  • Colonial legacies, decolonization and neo-imperialism
  • Aesthetics of race and racism
  • Race and cultural institutions
  • The politics of colour-blindness

Contributions from across the social and political sciences and the humanities are welcome. Please submit an abstract (max. 250-300 words) and a short bio (max. 100 words) by 15 May 2019 to acgs-fgw@uva.nl. Submissions for pre-constituted panels with a maximum of four papers are also welcome.

Organisers: Jeroen de Kloet, Amade M’charek, Thomas Poell (University of Amsterdam), Regina Kreide, Huub van Baar (Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Germany), Anikó Imre (University of Southern California, USA), Dušan Bjelić (University of Southern Maine, USA).

Human

Conference 2019 Human

The 3rd PARSE Biennial Research Conference: Human

13-15 November, 2019, Gothenburg.

Call for contributions: panels, papers, performances, screenings, collaborations and workshops

Deadline for abstracts: 31 March 2019

For submissions go to: https://www.conftool.org/parse2019/

HUMAN

The 3rd Biennial PARSE Research Conference takes its title Human to prompt an interdisciplinary and international debate on key issues of the contemporary global condition. Politically, culturally and theoretically, it is impossible today to navigate through the dense lattice of emergencies and urgencies without addressing the question of what constitutes the human, inhuman, subhuman and non-human, as well as formulating an adequate response to the anthropocenic threat posed by the human against the planet.

Historically, the category ‘human’ has been instrumental to the justification and practice of sovereignty and universalism in the Western world, insofar as delimiting and differentiating what ‘human’ means has been central to the project of modernity.

Such delineations have centered on questions of self-consciousness and language, intellectual ability in the form of abstract thought, the possession of a soul, tool-making capabilities, genetic inheritance or private property; however, they have demanded demarcations through the production of prohibition and hierarchization, in processes of inevitable social, political, legal, and economic violence.

Drawing on a broad interdisciplinary network of critical, creative, and pedagogical communities, PARSE seeks to stimulate exchange and dialogue about how to reimagine, remake, expose and expand the human vis-à-vis notions of the nonhuman, inhuman, subhuman, posthuman and inhumane. How can we rethink the conditions for a political imaginary capable of structural transformation and justice for human and nonhuman alike? What is at the heart of current debates on the human? What political imaginaries have enabled the current wave of xenophobic and neo-colonial dehumanization? How can the arts respond to what may be termed a crisis in humanity?

The main theme of the 3rd Biennial PARSE Research Conference 2019, Human, will be organised around 6 streams that will identify clusters for thinking about the human and its discontents. PARSE particularly welcomes proposals for papers on any subject within the traditions of art, design, craft, theatre, music, photography, film, literature, and arts education, including those disciplines from social science and the humanities that are operative within the arts.

PARSE welcomes doctoral student submissions, which will be presented in a session dedicated to ongoing doctoral research projects. When submitting please indicate if your submission should be considered for this session.

We welcome contributions that engage with the following topics:

* the inhuman, the subhuman, the body and inscriptions of the human (the contested universality of the human across the divisions of class, race, gender, trans, queer, ableism, neurodiversity)

* the imperiled non-human (the Anthropocene, nature, ecological catastrophe) and the technological non-human and objecthood (tools, machine, nature, world of objects, OOO, robotics, algorithms etc)

* the posthuman, pedagogy and the institution (anti-humanism, anti-anthropocentrism, critique of the humanities, the human produced by the university, knowledge and distinction, disciplines of the human)

* human mobility and nationhood (transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, migration, human rights, personhood)

* biopolitics, necropolitics and the governance of the category of the human

* decoloniality, post- and neo-colonialism (slavery, indigeneity, empire, desegregation, white Suprematism, white privilege)

All queries to: parse@konst.gu.se