Night Scenes

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: ‘NIGHT SCENES’ POSTGRADUATE ROUNDTABLE – University College London, 23 April 2020

UCL Urban Laboratory invites proposals from doctoral candidates and recent masters graduates to participate in a roundtable examining how night spaces have been imagined, produced, experienced and narrated in European cities by communities who have mobilized around particular migrant identities or histories. This roundtable forms part of the first international conference of the three-year transdisciplinary collaborative research project led by Dr Sara Brandellero at Leiden University’s Centre for the Arts in Society entitled Night spaces: migration, culture and integration in Europe (NITE) and funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA). The project explores nocturnal public spaces in eight cities in the Netherlands, Ireland, UK, Germany, Denmark and Portugal. The ‘Night Scenes’ conference will be held in London on 23-24 April 2020.

Further info on NITE, CFP and submission form are in the link below. We look forward to receiving your submissions. Deadline, 13 Jan. 2020.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/urban-lab/news/2019/dec/call-proposals-night-scenes-roundtable

 

Reduction: 12 post-doctoral fellowships in Berlin

The ICI Berlin announces 12 post-doctoral fellowships for the Academic Years 2020–22 on ‘Reduction’.

Critical discourse has little patience with reduction. One of its most devastating charges leveled against theories, analyses, and descriptions is that of being reductive or of amounting to a full-blown reductionism. Conceptual frameworks are scolded for being impoverished and descriptions for being too sparse or flat. And conversely, to call something ‘irreducible’ seems to confer an immediate and indisputable dignity to it. Yet the history of science and knowledge in general cannot be told without acknowledging the importance of reductionist programmes, from Stoic physics or mechanistic materialism to cybernetics and structuralism. Reductive paradigms have also periodically revitalized the arts, from neo-classicism to modernist design, from abstraction to minimalist investments or self-imposed arbitrary restrictions and aleatoric principles. Any attempt to reject these programmes will have to contend with their ambiguous effects and paradoxical investments, such as their ability to generate radical innovations, produce understanding, radically enlarge and unify theories, or promote progressive aesthetics and politics even before current ecological fears of mass extinction.
What lies at the root of such different attitudes towards ‘reduction’? How might their tensions be made productive? Or can one embrace forms of reduction that are not in the service of production, allowing for the possibility of a ‘less’ that would no longer have to amount to ‘more’?
The ICI Berlin’s new core project will explore the critical potentials of notions and practices of ‘reduction’, within and across different fields and approaches, from the sciences, technology, and the arts to feminist, queer, and decolonial approaches, inquiring in particular into the transversality of different economies of reduction and production, and into possibilities of escaping them.
Scholars from all disciplines are invited to engage in a joint exploration of ‘Reduction’. We especially welcome applications from individuals who will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity in scholarly research. The committed exchange between fellows is a central aim of the Institute. Applicants should be interested in a theoretical reflection on the conceptual and intellectual basis of their projects and in discussing it with fellows from other disciplines. In particular, fellows will be expected to participate in the weekly colloquia, bi-weekly informal meetings, and other activities of the Institute, to contribute to a common publication, and to be resident in Berlin for the duration of the fellowship.
The fellowships announced are for the academic years 2020 – 22 (14 September 2020 – 15 July 2022). There is no age limit, but applicants should have obtained their doctoral degree within ten years of the date of appointment or have submitted their dissertation by 19 January 2020. Stipends range from EUR 1900 to 2100 per month. Interested applicants should read also the full description of the Reduction project and follow the application instructions.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 19 January 2020 (23:59 CET) ICI Berlin | Christinenstraße 18/19, Haus 8 | D – 10119 Berlin | U – Bhf. Senefelder Platz (U2) | +49 (0)30 473 72 91 10 | www.ici–berlin.org

Propositions #10: Instituting Otherwise

For more information visit: https://www.bakonline.org/program-item/trainings-for-the-not-yet/training-program-trainings-for-the-not-yet/propositions-10-instituting-otherwise/


Propositions #10: Instituting Otherwise is a one-day public symposium on the civic practice of art institutions, organized by BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht on Saturday 7 December 2019, from 13.00–21.00 hrs. The symposium probes the question of how to institute spaces for art in the face of the pressing urgencies of the present.

Driven by these urgencies—such as environmental violence, persistent racism, systemic inequalities, as well as fascisms and micro-fascisms—the symposium engages with the proposition of the art institution as a microcosm of a world centered on social and ecological justice. In this proposition, the practices of the art institution are the actualization of the collective alternative imaginings of the “not-yet”: of “another world” and “another future.” Key to such an imaginary are the constituencies the institution serves, and the consequent re-compositions of institutional practice not only with regard to what western modernity used to call “audiences,” but across all institutional processes. The symposium discusses challenges related to such a repurposing of the art institution, and considers notions of civic practice, collaborative learning and radical pedagogy, solidarity and mutual care, as well as the fallacy of institutional politico-ideological neutrality.

The notion of “instituting otherwise” has been an adage since the inception of BAK in 2000, which has driven its practice as a basis where art, research, theory, and social action meet in coalition to imagine and actualize alternatives to today’s world. Over the past twenty years, BAK has been developing this notion through various multifaceted programs, research, and publications, as well as in intensive collaborations with its multi-talented, poly-vocal constituencies. “Instituting otherwise” is a method of continuous interrogation of the conditions of the world,with and alongside these constituencies, and a way of confronting the injustices in the world collectively and propositionally. It is at the same time a systematic move away from institutions as they persist—specifically in the west and in ways redolent of the colonial era—as custodians of power engaged in depoliticizing and neutralizing the possibility of art as aesthetico-political experimentation geared toward another future. Instead, this method moves toward a concrete, tactical realization of alternatives to the world we know today.

With contributions by: Yasmin Ahmed (activist, Amsterdam), Isshaq Al-Barbary(writer and researcher, Amsterdam), Barby Asante (artist, curator, and educator, London), Matthijs de Bruijne (artist and union organizer, Amsterdam), Mitchell Esajas (anthropologist, curator, and social entrepreneur, Amsterdam), Jeanne van Heeswijk (artist, Rotterdam), Maria Hlavajova (General and Artistic Director of BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht), Triwish Hanoeman (musician and cultural entrepreneur, Utrecht), Nicoline van Harskamp (artist, Amsterdam), Natalia Kulik(public speaker, moderator and project coordinator, Utrecht), Andrea Phillips (theorist and writer, London), Laura Raicovich (curator and writer, New York), Shay Raviv (social designer and researcher, Utrecht), Jun Saturay (artist, Utrecht),Mustapha Seray Bah (trainer, organizer, discussion leader, Utrecht), and others.

Propositions #10: Instituting Otherwise is a temporary spin-off from Trainings for the Not-Yet (14 September 2019–12 January 2020) currently taking place at BAK, and is the tenth iteration of BAK’s long-term research series Propositions for Non-Fascist Living (2017–ongoing), which seeks to collectively think and act out ways of being together otherwise. The symposium is preceded by a series of workshops for fellow art institutions, funds, and policy makers in the Netherlands, held at BAK on 6 December 2019. Both these events are part of BAK’s commitment to public practice and aim to share preliminary learnings from Trainings for the Not-Yet, specifically at the point where many art institutions in the Netherlands are finalizing their policies for the forthcoming four-year funding period.

When: 
Saturday 7 December, 13–21 hrs, including dinner from 17.45–19 hrs in the Basic Activist Kitchen
Language: English

The Johan Huizinga Fellowship for historical research

The Johan Huizinga Fund/Rijksmuseum Fund offers early career scholars the opportunity to conduct historical research into objects in the Rijksmuseum collection. Candidates are invited to submit a research proposal that draws on these objects as subject material and as sources of historical information. The Johan Huizinga Fellowship is primarily intended for candidates whose focus is on the historical role and symbolic meaning of objects, on material culture and/or the societal context in which these artifacts were used. Therefore, please note that this fellowship does not welcome proposals with an exclusive art-historical focus (e.g. emphasising artistic style, oeuvres or art techniques). The Rijksmuseum will endeavor to enable publication of the Fellow’s research, for example in the series Rijksmuseum Studies in History or in The Rijksmuseum Bulletin. The Rijksmuseum will provide joint working space for the Fellows, in order to stimulate an exchange of knowledge, ideas and experience. Access will be given to all relevant resources in the museum, such as the Research Library Collections, collection documentation and the Rijksmuseum’s archives.

Eligibility

  • The Johan Huizinga Fellowship is open to MA graduates, as well as PhD students and post-doctoral candidates. MA Graduate/PhD Fellows are those who have completed their MA degree or whose proposal is embedded in the research plans of their forthcoming PhD dissertation, postdoctoral Fellows must have completed their PhD dissertation and obtained a PhD-degree on the date of application.
  • Fellowships are open to candidates of all nationalities and with varied specialisms. They may include researchers specialising in the fields of general history, cultural historical studies or art history.
  • Candidates should have proven research capabilities, academic credentials and excellent command of the English language – both written and spoken. Proficiency in a second language (ideally Dutch or German) is preferred but not required.

Funding

Fellowship stipends are awarded to help support a Fellow’s study and research efforts during the tenure of his/her appointment. The stipend of €29,250 for MA graduate/PhD Fellows or €33,750 for postdoctoral Fellows (subject to taxes and deductions) is for a period of nine months commencing 1 September 2020, the start of the academic year. The Rijksmuseum will cover visa fees for the Fellow, but not for dependents.

Application and procedure

Complete applications have to be submitted through the online application system. Please follow the link below to learn about the required documents for application.

Apply here

The Rijksmuseum is committed to actively promoting equality, diversity and inclusion. We therefore encourage all potential candidates to apply.

The closing date for all applications is 19 January 2020, at 6:00 p.m. (Amsterdam time/CET), but candidates are encouraged to apply at their earliest convenience. No applications will be accepted after the deadline. All applications must be submitted online and in English. Applications or related materials delivered via email, postal mail, or in person will not be accepted.

Selection will be made by an international committee in February 2020. The committee consists of eminent scholars in the relevant fields of study from European universities and institutions, and members of the curatorial staff of the Rijksmuseum. Applicants will be notified by 15 March 2020. All Fellowships will start in September 2020.

Further information

  • For questions concerning the application procedure, contact the Coordinator of Academic Programmes (fellowships@rijksmuseum.nl).
  • For questions concerning the Johan Huizinga Fellowship, contact Gijs van der Ham, Senior Curator of History (G.vander.Ham@rijksmuseum.nl)

Exploring Interdisciplinary Approaches to Songs and Practices of Singing (1200-today).

Song Studies 2020

Call for papers. The Amsterdam Centre for Cross-Disciplinary Emotion and Sensory Studies and THALIA, research group on the Interplay of Theatre, Literature & Media in Performance. Ghent University, 1-3 July 2020. Keynote speaker: Monique Scheer (Tübingen University)

The singing voice is a medium of expression that is found in all times and cultures. People have always been singing, not only to perform entertainingly, but also to express emotions or to embody identities. This has for example made collective singing (and listening) practices a primary way for people to articulate and embody the identities that are fundamental to the existence of social groups. The bodily and sensory experience of moving and sounding together in synchrony, enables individuals to experience feelings of togetherness with others.

Song is the versatile medium facilitating such processes. Songs can evoke and channel emotions, employing them for specific (or less specific) means. As a multimodal genre, song enables not only the articulation and embodiment of ideas; as an inherently oral and intangible medium, songs can move through space and time, transgressing any material form. Therefore, songs have proven an ideal tool for the distribution of news, contentious ideas, or mobilising messages.

This conference aims to bring together researchers from various disciplines investigating song (for example musicology, literary studies, history, sociology, performance studies, cognition studies, anthropology, etc.). The focus will be on the definition of possible approaches to the study of this medium (both in its material and performed existence), its performances (in any form) and reception (in any context). Research examples may cover songs written and sung in any culture and language, and any (historical) period. Common ground will be found through concepts, approaches and methodologies, encouraging an interdisciplinary and transhistorical dialogue, breaking ground for a new research field: song studies.

Possible research areas and questions to be explored are:

 how to study the multimodality of the genre, acknowledging both textual and musical characteristics, and its performative nature;

 the sensory/bodily and emotional/affective experience of listening and singing;

 cognitive and/or affective processes of singing (and collective singing practices);

 how to study the performative aspects of songs in historical contexts;

 the ‘power’/agency of song;

 the role of song and singing in social processes and historical developments; etc.

We invite proposals for 20-minute individual papers (max. 300 words) or alternative formats (pre-submission inquiry is encouraged). As the aim of this conference is to facilitate dialogue, there will be ample time for discussion and exchange. Please send your proposal, including your name, academic affiliation and a short biographical note, no later than 20 December 2019 to renee.vulto@ugent.be.

For more information and registration, see www.songstudies.ugent.be.