Metamodernism Conference at Radboud University

Website: Metamodernism Conference at Radboud University

Programme Metamodernism Conference

3-5 July 2019

Wednesday July 3 – location: Theatre room C, Elinor Ostrom building
7.30 pm – 9.30 pm: Reading Will Self

Thursday July 4 – location: EOS 01.150, Elinor Ostrom building

9.00-9.30: Registration / refreshments
9.30-9.45: Welcome (Antony Rowland, Dennis Kersten, Usha Wilbers)
9.45-10.45: Keynote lecture – Timotheus Vermeulen & Robin van den Akker
10.45-11.15: Break
11.15-12.00: Panel – The Metamodernist Novel (I)
 Katherine Burn – “Dwelling in Shame: A Heideggerian conceptualisation of place in Fiona Mozley’s Elmet”
 Kasimir Sandbacka –“Metamodern utopianism in Emma Puikkonen’s Eurooppalaiset unet”
12.00-12.45: Panel – Global Ethics
 Alison Gibbons – “Metamodernist Futures or “a future that had never arrived”: Climate Change and Temporality in 10:04”  Andrew Corsa – “Grand Narratives, Metamodernism, and Global Ethics”
12.45-1.45: Lunch
1.45-3.15: Panel – Metamodernist poetry
 Janien Linde – “Relational performatism as metamodern practice: a case study of the poetry of Marlene van Niekerk”
 Diya Nadkarni – “Poetic autonomy, poetic engagement: metamodernism and the politics of contemporary poetry”
 Anna Helle – “Metamodernism in Contemporary Finnish Literature”
3.15-3.45: Break
3.45-4.30: Poetry Reading – Antony Rowland & Alistair Noon
4.30-5.15: Panel – Metamodernist Music
 Niels van Poecke – “Pure Taste in Popular Music: On Poly-Purism as Metamodern Consumption”
 Greg Dember – “‘Punk Rock for Sissies’ – The Return of Affect in Early 21st Century American Indie Rock”
7.30 conference dinner at De Hemel http://www.brouwerijdehemel.nl/

Friday July 5 – location: EOS 01.610, Elinor Ostrom building

9.00-9.30: Refreshments
9.30-10.30: Keynote lecture David James – “Uplift: Contemporary Sentimentalism and the Literature of Amelioration”
10.30-11.00: Break
11.00-12.30: Panel – After Modernism / The Avant Garde
 Wit Pietrzak – “Has Literature Run Out of Steam? Experimental Prose and Reified Monomania”
 Alexandra Dumitrescu – “Is the Metamodern the Last Frontier?”
 Liam Harrison – “Make it Late: Metamodernism After Samuel Beckett”
12.30-1.30: Lunch
1.30-3.00: Panel – The Metamodernist Novel (II)
 Arya Aryan – “’The Novel in the Age of Risk Society: Metamodernism as an Alternative”
 Mika Hallila – “The Ethics and Poetics of Oscillation in Asko Sahlberg’s The Brothers”
 Michaela Beck – “The ‘New Sincere’ Master of the ‘Great Art of Telling the Truth’:
Tracing Authorship from Wallace to Emerson in Ed Park’s Personal Days”
3.00-3.30: Break
3.30-5.00: Panel – Metamodernist Visual Culture
 Tom Drayton – “Hope/Less: The Politics of Metamodern Theatre”
 Jeroen Boom – “Mapping the Metamodern City: Urban Representations in Indie Cinema”
 Chantal Hassard – “Performative Painting in Metamodernity”
5.00-5.30: Closing remarks + drinks

Site specific theatrical performance/boat trip

https://www.sitesofmemory.nl/

UvA faculty and students can avail of discounted tickets of 15 EUR each for the performances on 23 June 20.00 hrs and 27 June 19.00 hrs.

On 27 June 2019 at 19hrs there will be a short introduction in the University Theatre, Nieuwe Doelenstraat 16, 1012 CP Amsterdam.

Fill in the code UVA-SITESOFMEMORY2019 when booking the ticket.

Sites of Memory is a project by Jennifer Tosch (founder of the Black Heritage Tours Amsterdam) and Katy Streek (theatre maker and programmer). Since 2016 they create a new performance, a theatrical boattrip about the ‘hidden’ stories about the history of slavery and colonialism in Amsterdam. The audience is taken past historical sites whilst spoken word artists, dancers, musicians and visual artists bring history to the present. This year they will research the theme ‘Emerging Memory’.

The performances dates: 22nd of June to 4th of July 2019

Made possible with the generous support of Netherlands Institute for Cultural Analysis (NICA) and Amsterdam Heritage and Memory Studies (AHM).

Guest Lecture: “Unmaking a Chocolate City: Spatial Aesthetics of Race and the Gentrifying Urban Landscape” by Brandi T. Summers

Caption: A now-defunct brewery in Washington, D.C.; an anti-gentrification sticker posted on a construction site in Washington, D.C. (credit: Joseph Young)

Time: Friday, 21 June, 15:00-17:00

Location: room 1.05, P.C. Hoofthuis, Spuistraat 134

Tracing Washington, D.C.’s shift from a Chocolate City to becoming a “post-chocolate” cosmopolitan metropolis, this talk discusses the continuing significance of blackness in the U.S. capital, and discuss how blackness is integral to our understanding of the city.

I focus on the production of racial aesthetics through the management of black excess in the Atlas District, a historic and rapidly-gentrifying area of Washington, D.C. In other words, I use blackness as a logic to understand and theorize contemporary urban processes, especially processes and practices of gentrification. Theoretically, I offer black aesthetic emplacement as a way to understand how blackness is aestheticized and deployed to fortify public order, organize urban landscapes, and foster capital. Extending Katherine McKittrick’s (2006) assertion that “Black matters are spatial matters,” I argue that spatial matters are also aesthetic matters. This relationship provides the foundation for an urban theory of aesthetics that accounts for what Black studies brings to bear on material processes of urbanization, namely the precarity of always becoming.

About the speaker
Dr. Brandi T. Summers is Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Associate Executive Director of the Institute for Inclusion, Inquiry and Innovation (iCubed) at Virginia Commonwealth University. Her research and teaching focus on race, gender, urban aesthetics, fashion, media studies, and visual culture. Her forthcoming book, Black in Place: The Spatial Aesthetics of Race in a Post-Chocolate City (UNC Press, October 2019), explores the way that competing notions of blackness structure efforts to raise capital and develop land in Washington, D.C. She has published several articles and essays that analyze the relationship between race, power, aesthetics, and urbanization that appear in both academic and popular publications. Her research has been supported by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the Social Science Research Council, among others.

Professor J.M. van Winter Stipend 2019

The board of the Stichting Gastronomische Bibliotheek invites students and researchers to submit requests for the Professor J.M. van Winter Stipend 2019.

With this stipend, the Stichting Gastronomische Bibliotheek aims to:

  • commemorate the major contributions of Professor J.M. van Winter, emeritus professor of Medieval History at Utrecht University, to the study of the history of eating and drinking in the Middle Ages;
  • encourage the use of the History of Food collection of the Special Collections of the University of Amsterdam.

The Stichting Gastronomische Bibliotheek was established in 1993 by Johannes van Dam, Joop Witteveen and Bart Cuperus with the aim of preserving for future generations their private collections on the history of food. In 2005, the Stichting decided to bring their collection under the umbrella of the Special Collections of the University of Amsterdam.

The Professor J.M. van Winter Stipend

Each year, the Stichting Gastronomische Bibliotheek makes a stipend of €1000 available for research that makes particular use of the History of Food collection of the Special Collections of the University of Amsterdam. This research is intended to throw further light on a particular aspect of the history of food and drink. The stipend is to be used as compensation for travel, accommodation and research costs and must be fully spent within one year of allocation.

The results of the research should be presented in writing in the form of a brief report. The researcher will be invited to give a short presentation of their research during the next Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food.

Candidates

Students or researchers studying or working at a university in the Netherlands or abroad are eligible to apply.

Applications

Applications should comprise:

  • a research proposal of no more than 500 words;
  • a brief CV;
  • a fully completed application form.

Applications must be submitted by 15 August 2019 to:

Bijzondere Collecties, attn. Ms J.J. Mammen, Oude Turfmarkt 129, 1012 GC Amsterdam (email: j.j.mammen@uva.nl).

Applications will be assessed by Professor J.M. van Winter and the jury of the Joop Witteveen Prize: Dr D. De Vooght, M. Willebrands Ma, Prof. K.J. Cwiertka, S. van der Veen Ma and Dr M. van Roon.

Announcement

The announcement of the recipient of the Professor J.M. van Winter Stipend will take place during the Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food 2019 on Friday 15 November 2019. All applicants will be contacted before 15 October 2019.

See: https://bijzonderecollecties.uva.nl/en/shared-content/news/news/2019/02/ashf-stipend.html

 

Summer School Communicating Difficult Pasts

Kuldīga, 2–7 August 2019

Deadline for applications: 3 June.

MA and PhD humanities students, as well as early-career artists, art historians, curators and cultural studies researchers are welcome to apply.

We live in a time of increasing violence, which is gender, community and class based. These aspects need to be considered in order to understand its operation, while finding ways to communicate both past and present violence has become pertinent for understanding contemporary societies. This year’s Summer School programme will explore the complexities of communicating the 20th-century past, and analyse how art and culture can advance debates and thus influence current realities.

For the sixth year the Summer School of the Latvian Centre for Contemporary Art (LCCA) is held in cooperation with Kuldīga Artist Residency, the Art Academy of Latvia and the Estonian Academy of Arts. The Summer School continues to draw on developments in critical thinking, artistic research and creative practices related to actual debates in contemporary culture. This year its central theme will be how violent pasts remain with us and how contemporary artistic research and curatorial projects have found ways to mediate their different dimensions. Our programme will bring together interdisciplinary scholars, artists and curators who have analysed the contemporary legacies of the Second World War and related them to Cold War and postcolonial frameworks.

Difficult knowledge (Roger Simon, Erica Lehrer) and difficult heritage (Sharon MacDonald) offer important perspectives to traumatic and long-silenced histories and modes of their remembering. These discourses bring themes which are often invisible or marginalised in public knowledge. Artists and scholars engaging with these subjects confront the increasingly prevailing representations of selective memory, which by rejecting particular experiences, ignore difficult history. The mediations of difficult pasts we will touch upon concern violent conflicts and traumatic losses, their afterlives in personal experiences, the lives of communities owing to forced migration and deportation, subjugation of indigenous people, practices of exclusion and othering of communities. In the workshops we will consider how could more complex and layered histories be told that complement disputed pasts with new perspectives, in ways that combine critical consciousness with empathic understanding and how could violent histories be narrated in ethical and audience-conscious ways. 

The Summer School Communicating Difficult Pasts will focus on the uneasy relations between pasts and presents, their entangled nature in the 20th century and the impact that these difficult histories have left to contemporary realities in the Baltic Sea region. Topics such as the legacy of right- and left-wing ideologies and their impact on rising populism, intolerance towards cultural difference and marginalisation of ethnic minorities or queer communities are entangled in the region with histories of the Holocaust, Soviet repressions and colonialisms. These experiences are often addressed, researched and discussed locally or nationally; this Summer School aims at understanding the relationships between these difficult and traumatic pasts and articulating their influences and presence today through the perspective of shared histories. We will consider how to apply intersectionality to thinking about the past and present in the Baltic Sea region. 

The Summer School Communicating Difficult Pasts will focus on the uneasy relations between pasts and presents, their entangled nature in the 20th century and the impact that these difficult histories have left to contemporary realities in the Baltic Sea region. Topics such as the legacy of right- and left-wing ideologies and their impact on rising populism, intolerance towards cultural difference and marginalisation of ethnic minorities or queer communities are entangled in the region with histories of the Holocaust, Soviet repressions and colonialisms. These experiences are often addressed, researched and discussed locally or nationally; this Summer School aims at understanding the relationships between these difficult and traumatic pasts and articulating their influences and presence today through the perspective of shared histories.

Speakers organising workshops and lectures are distinguished thinkers and experts in the fields of visual art, cultural history and theory, as well as memory, feminist and LGBTQ+ studies. They will introduce research and curatorial projects and discuss intersections between minority studies, postcommunist and postcolonial discourses. The speakers include Violeta Davoliūtė, Professor at the Institute of International Relations and Political Science, Vilnius University, Ilya Lensky, Director of the Museum ‘Jews in Latvia’ (tbc), artist Harri Pälviranta from Finland, Adi Kuntsman, Senior Lecturer from the Manchester Metropolitan University and Norwegian-Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara.

The curators of the Summer School programme are Ieva Astahovska and Margaret Tali. 

Participation in the Summer School is free of charge; however, participants must cover partial accommodation and catering costs of 80 EUR. 

To apply to participate, please fill out the application formtiny.cc/lccasummerschool and submit it by email with a CV and a letter of motivation in English by email. Additionally, you can add a creative portfolio including projects or one to two publications related to the theme.

The deadline for applications is 3 June 2019. Please email the documents to: lccasummerschool@gmail.com. We will respond to applicants by 14 June.

For any questions regarding application, please contact Ieva Astahovska at ieva.ast@gmail.com