Seminar Series – Opera Forward Festival 2019

Seminar Series – Opera Forward Festival 2019

1-3 March 2019, Dutch National Opera, Amsterdam

The 2019 edition of the Opera Forward Festival (Dutch National Opera) in Amsterdam bears the theme “Identity and Confrontation”. The festival organises a seminar series on the 1, 2 and 3 of March 2019, wherein questions of decolonization in relation to the arts and culture will be at the forefront. Leading scholars and artists will discuss what the critique of Eurocentrism entails in their own artistic practice and what challenges the call for epistemic diversity poses in researching the arts.

Friday 1 March 2019

14-15h: Attendance of public rehearsal

17.30h: Keynote by Peter Sellars, opera director

Saturday 2 March 2019

16.00-17.00 Seminar with Dr. Olivia Rutazibwa

17.30h: Keynote by Dr. Olivia Rutazibwa, Senior Lecturer Development Studies, University of Portsmouth: Decolonising Western European cultural traditions

https://oliviarutazibwa.wordpress.com/category/english/

Preparatory reading:

https://issblog.nl/2018/07/04/epistemic-diversity-understanding-epistemic-diversity-decoloniality-as-research-strategy/

Sunday 3 March 2019

16.00-17.00 Seminar with Neo Muyanga

17.30h: Keynote by Neo Muyanga, musician, composer, researcher at University of Cape Town: Decolonising Western European Music

http://www.neosong.net

Preparatory reading:

Songs in the Key of Revolution: Brad Evans interviews Neo Muyanga

https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/histories-of-violence-songs-key-revolution/#

Open to all. RMA Students can receive 3 EC for attending all the sessions and writing a review assignment of 1000 words.

Register by sending an email to: e.hermus@operaballet.nl stating your university programme and student number.

For further information contact Sruti Bala, s.bala@uva.nl

 

Opera Forward Festival 2019

http://operaforwardfestival.nl

On Crime, Crowds, and the City: Poe, Dickens, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche

On Crime, Crowds, and the City: Poe, Dickens, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche

Masterclass and lecture by Jeremy Tambling  organized by Ben Moore

Date/Time/Location: March 7th 2019. Masterclass at 13.30-15.30 in PC Hoofthuis 6.25. Lecture at 17.00-18.00 in PC Hoofthuis 1.04.

Abstract: This event explores the relationship between crime/the criminal and the city, in relation to a range of mainly nineteenth-century authors: Poe, Dickens, Collins, George Eliot, Dostoevsky, Stevenson, but also James Joyce. The main theoretical approach is drawn from Nietzsche, and Klossowski’s readings of him, and from Freud. The masterclass and talk link crime as transgression with the idea of writing (especially writing the city) as transgressive, where writing is understood as an attempt to produce the ‘new word’ that Raskolnikov speaks of when justifying crime and transgression in Crime and Punishment. Baudelaire’s prose poems and Joyce’s writing are taken to be examples of this new word, or movements towards it, which exerts a price in the case of Joyce, as seen in the arguments raised about schizophrenia in his writing. Conceptualisations of criminality in the writers mentioned above are compared to Nietzsche on the pale criminal from Zarathustra, and what Freud discusses when he thinks of ‘criminals from a sense of guilt’. In both cases, questions of identity are at the heart of the discussion: crime as fixing identity; crime as escape from rationalising forces which define what the subject is.

These topics will be explored in a 2-hour masterclass (aimed primarily at graduate students), followed later by a 1-hour lecture and discussion. If you wish to take part in the masterclass, please contact Ben Moore (B.P.Moore@uva.nl) to register and receive selected readings in advance.

1EC is available via NICA for Research Masters students who participate in both parts of the event.

Guest Speaker: Jeremy Tambling was formerly Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Hong Kong, and previously Professor of Literature at the University of Manchester. His work is wide ranging, with particular interests in topics such as Dante, Blake, Dickens, literature and the city, allegory, and psychoanalysis. His recent book publications include Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby, and the Dance of Death (2019), Histories of the Devil: Marlowe to Mann, and the Manichees (2017), The Palgrave Handbook of Literature and the City, (editor, 2016), and Dickens’ Novels as Poetry: Allegory and Literature in the City (2014).

The Afterlife of the Object

CALL FOR PAPERS

European Summer School in Cultural Studies

University of Copenhagen, 18-22 June 2018

An object causes passion, as in the figurative notion of a loved object. “The Afterlife of the Object” 2018 summer school will contemplate how we establish narratives of the past and the self through objects.

We will view objects, not only loved, but also hated, ignored, collected, thrown away, performed, written, rewritten, translated, lost and found. The “object” of our study will be considered broadly, including but not limited to art, books, collections, fetishes, poems, letters, song, and beyond.

For example, in “The Daughters of the Moon,” Italo Calvino imagines the afterlife of earth’s only permanent natural satellite when she has she become too old and worn to be seen as “full.” Calvino’s story is a troubling allegory on consumerism, ecology, gender, destruction and desire, written in the ripe year of 1968.

In Slaves and Other Objects (2004), the classicist Page duBois looks at our erasure of slaves as an idealization of the afterlife of ancient Greece, resulting in a collective blind-spot (a de-realization) that has fed and still feeds troubling views on race, including America’s nostalgia for the antebellum South.

Han Kang’s 1997 short story “The Fruit of My Woman” takes the afterlife of animals as objects of food as entry into becoming plant.

Lee Edelman’s No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive puts a stop to mortgaging our future through the body of the child in an acceptance of the death drive through the afterlives of Hitchcock’s films.

The summer school week will feature keynote lectures (to be announced) as well as short papers presented by PhD candidates and other young scholars and a series of seminars in which we will closely examine the texts mentioned above, along with other works, including Dan Chaisson’s book of poems, entitled The Afterlife of Objects and Michael Ann Holly’s The Melancholy Art.

We welcome papers dealing with these questions from art historical, cultural, literary, cinematic, material, affective, technological, machinic, linguistic and other perspectives.

Applicants do not need to present a paper. However, those wishing to present should send a proposal of no more than 300 words and a short bio (max. 150 words) to:

afterlifeoftheobject@gmail.com by 25 January 2019. You will be informed whether your contribution has been accepted by 8 February 2019. Papers will be circulated before the conference and will have to be submitted in full (max. 4,000 words) by 1 May 2019.

PhD students are credited 3,8 ECTS if certain requirements are met. For more information, please contact the organizers.

The ESSCS is an annual network-based event offering interdisciplinary research training in the fields of art and culture. The network comprises the University of Amsterdam, Leiden University, University of Copenhagen, University of Giessen, Goldsmiths College, Université de Paris VIII, the Lisbon Consortium, Ljubljana Institute for Humanities, University of Trondheim and Catholic University Rio de Janeiro.

Organizers: Frederik Tygstrup, Rune Gade and Carol Mavor.

Transmission in Motion Seminar 2018-19

Experiment/Experience

“Have we forgotten experience?” wonders Scott Lash (Experience, 2018). If this is so, we are currently witnessing a comeback with a vengeance. New forms of research and communication explore and experiment with various dimensions of experience. Art and science meet in experimental approaches that foreground sensation, substance and practice. Technological developments “expand the sensible” (Mark Hansen) beyond human experience, challenging the centrality of human experience and raising the question of the relationship between human experience, technological agents and data. Critical thinkers  from a diversity of backgrounds (including media, archaeology, new materialism, post-phenomenology, radical empiricism, human geography and embodied cognition) unpack aspects of the intimate relationship between experience and knowing and point to meaning as material practice of experience.

The Transmission in Motion Seminar is a more-or-less monthly gathering of researchers and students from across disciplines. To participate, please send an email to TIM@UU.nl to receive additional information and readings. RMA Students can acquire 3 EC (awarded by NICA) if they attend all meetings and write blogposts after each meeting. Please register at TIM@UU.nl. For more information, contact Maaike Bleeker at m.a.bleeker@uu.nl.

Seminar program TiM seminar 2018-19

25 October 2018 (15-17h): Prof. dr. Derek McCormack (Oxford University) “Experience/experiment and atmospheric things.”
Place: Parnassos Bar, Kruisstraat 201, Utrecht.

22 November 2018 (15-17h): Prof. dr. Sarah Bay Cheng (Bowdoin College) “Everybody’s Historiography: When Museums Play Digital Games.”
Place: Parnassos Bar, Kruisstraat 201), Utrecht.

13 December 2018 (15-17h): Prof. dr. Nathalie Sinclair (Simon Fraser University): “Multiplication as Experience: Whitehead, aesthetics and gesture-based, touchscreen technology.”
Place: Grote Zaal, Kromme Nieuwegracht 20, Utrecht.

23 January 2019 (15-17h): Prof. dr. Tim Ingold (University of Aberdeen) title tba.
15-17h, Parnassos Bar, Kruisstraat 201, Utrecht.

28 February 2019 (15-17h): Dr. Adam Nocek (Arizona State University): “Designing the Dispositif: Between the Art and Reason of Government.”
15-17h, Parnassos Bar, Kruisstraat 201, Utrecht.

28 March 2019 (15-17h): Dr. Arun Saldanha (University of Minnesota): “The Stratification of Cyberspace: from Experience to Waste”
15-17h, Parnassos Bar, Kruisstraat 201, Utrecht.

2 May 2019 (15-17h): Dr. Eef Masson (University of Amsterdam): “The Sensory Moving Image.”
15-17h, Parnassos Bar, Kruisstraat 201, Utrecht.

 

 

6 June 2019, TBA

Transmission in Motion is a hybrid research community that brings researchers from across disciplines together with artists and other partners from outside the academy. Transmission in Motion provides a platform for seminars, meetings and presentations, and mediates the development of partnerships and research projects. https://transmissioninmotion.sites.uu.nl/

Urban Crisis-Scapes: On Walks and Ruins

Workshop organized by Eva Fotiadi and Maria Boletsi, in collaboration with Ipek Celik (Koç University), Amsterdam, Belle van Zuylenzaal, 16-17 May 2019

The workshop will focus on city-scapes that have recently been radically reconfigured through pervasive frameworks of crisis – financial, political, humanitarian etc. We want to explore alternative experiences of urban space, new artistic imaginaries, and innovative cultural initiatives emerging from such urban crisis-scapes by centering on two distinct but interrelated thematic lines:

Ruins (day one)

Speakers:

Sadia Abbas (Rutgers University), Ipek Celik-Rappas (Koç University), László Munteán (Radboud University of Groningen), Dimitris Papanikolaou (Oxford University), Dimitris Plantzos (National & Kapodistrian University of Athens), Daan Wesselman (University of Amsterdam)
Recent crisis-frameworks have produced new material ruins and transformed the functions of past ruins. The workshop will explore the new meanings and the sociopolitical and affective functions of ruins in crisis-scapes, as well as figurations of such ruins in cinema and art: ruins that range from monuments or antiquities to vestiges of disaffected zones such as derelict factories, deserted buildings, and abandoned construction sites. Images of ruins often exemplify the material consequences of crisis. But ruins are not only markers of decay and desolation. They often become the ‘canvas’ for creative projects and artistic interventions (e.g., through street art) that mobilize ruins to articulate alternative modes of being in a present of crisis and of envisioning the future. Ruins may thus be involved in subaltern narratives, suppressed histories or radical imaginaries that challenge crisis as “judgment of failure.” But they can also become commercialized and fetishized (e.g., in crisis-tourism or ‘ruin porn’) or revamped as fashionable objects. In cities with a dominant presence of ancient and historical ruins – such as Athens or Istanbul – new ruins interact with ruins of the past, reconfiguring the traditional functions of the latter. New artistic and cinematic languages seek innovative ways to explore the relation of material ruins and precarious subjects afflicted by crisis. What new meanings and operations do ancient and modern ruins assume against the backdrop of pervasive crises? Can ruins and their cinematic, literary or artistic figurations contribute to alternative narratives of modernity, the nation, crisis and futurity?

Walks (day two)

Speakers:

Aristidis Antonas (Architectural Association London) , Angeliki Avgitidou (University of Western Macedonia), Efi Giannetopoulou (University of Amsterdam),  Sigrid Merx (Utrecht University), Asli Ozgen-Tuncer (University of Amsterdam), Kathrin Wildner (HafenCity University Hamburg)
Initiatives that use walking as a medium – springing from art projects to architectural research and crisis-tourism – have become increasingly popular. Some walks aim to observe and reflect upon the transformed urban space: vacant housing and commercial spaces, the new homeless, waves of migrants and refugees or the graffiti on derelict buildings. Others show interest in forgotten layers of a city’s turbulent history, which re-emerge through such initiatives and assume new meanings and affective functions in a turbulent present. In other cases – as for example in Athens – guided tours are organized by homeless people or by theatre makers, who set up performative walks aiming to reconcile citizens with the new poor and with districts considered dangerous or ‘migrant ghettos.’ Many of these walks and tours could be considered as crisis voyeurism or as unsolicited quasi-anthropological inquiries that produce (new) social and cultural alterities. However, some of them can also be seen as attempts by locals to make sense of their own situation beyond dominant and over-mediatized crisis narratives. When artists adapt ethnographic methodologies in such initiatives, are they inescapably trapped in a “realist assumption” about the “Other” or in their own “presumptions of ethnographic authority” (Hal Foster)? Can such initiatives contribute to opening up alternative futures for cities in crisis and their inhabitants?

By thinking walks and ruins together, the workshop will address the following topics, among others:

  • Walking as methodology in artistic, architectural, urbanist and other research
  • Revisiting “the artist as ethnographer” discourse
  • Tours around ancient, modern and contemporary historic sites and ruins and spaces of daily life; graffiti tours; “torture and freedom tours” (Documenta14 in collaboration with ASKI, Athens)
  • New significations and functions of ancient and modern ruins against the backdrop of crises
  • Literary, photographic, cinematic and other representations of ruins and narratives of walking within crisis-scapes
  • Alternative uses of ruined, derelict, empty spaces and their relation to subjects who squat, reside and interact with such spaces.
  • New collectivities and social practices emerging from walking and engaging with ruins
  • The role of ruins in shaping alternative narratives of modernity, the nation, crisis and futurity.
  • The (ir)relevance of established theoretical approaches to walking as a cultural practice, from Benjamin’s flâneur to Michel de Certeau’s tactical consumer

To Apply:

RMA and PhD students who wish to attend the workshop may apply by sending an email to NICA (nica-fgw @ uva.nl) by March 1, 2019, with the subject line: Urban Crisis-Scapes: On Walks and Ruins. The workshop will be limited to 25 participants.

Credits:

RMA students and PhD candidates can earn 1 ECT for their participation in the workshop.

Credit requirements: Participation in a preparatory session of the ASCA research group Crisis, Critique and Futurity (15:00-17:00 Friday afternoon, date and room t.b.a.) and preparation of key readings common for preparatory research group session and workshop by selected workshop speakers; attendance of both workshop days.