Entries by Murat Aydemir

Politics of Boredom

The punk youth of the 70s, with no prospect on a future, but with a fiery desire to reject, shouted “London’s burning with boredom” in unison with the Clash song. In the 2000s, the Apple factory claimed that the workers in China committed suicide “out of boredom”, even though their working conditions were “just fine.” Can boredom work as a collective force for creativity? Can it be an affective entry point to build new political subjectivities?

Elvis Lives in Amsterdam

CFP, deadline May 21, 2018 | We aim to have an interdisciplinary discussion about the various ways in which our understanding of musicians taps into the imaginary, and what case studies about musicians can teach us about the imaginary constitution of our everyday experiences. Our interest will not be to debunk myths, but to understand what role imaginary representations of musicians play in our personal lives, in society and the arts in general.

Moving Together: Activism, Art and Education, with Angela Davis

Week-long programme, May 12-17, 2018 | Artists, educators and activists have often been at the forefront of challenging social and cultural hierarchies within society. Events of the past decade have highlighted a noticeable increase in authoritarianism, racism, sexism, environmental disasters and economic hardship at local and global levels. This turbulent climate has prompted significant responses in the form of social movements calling for more inclusion, decolonization, and liberation within cultural and educational institutions. Moving Together aspires to amplify ongoing conversations on refugee, anti-racist, feminist, queer, trans*, anti-border, anti-nationalist, prison abolition, and environmental justice struggles through sharing knowledge and strengthening connections between arts, activism and education.

New Materialism, Politics and Design Cultures in the Humanities

Workshop, April 12 | The humanities has recently undergone a paradigm shift in its turn to ‘new materialism’. This new materialist perspective has had profound implications for humanities’ understanding of politics not as delimited to a specific domain of human activity but as a complex and scattered reality where power is thoroughly distributed between different entities. How can the humanities, by engaging with this new materialist understanding of politics, be relevant to urgent societal and scientific questions today?

As Slowly As Possible: Entangled Temporalities

Workshop, May 24, 3 EC | In a comparative analysis, we will discuss the four keynotes’ different approaches towards the interrelation of the temporality of media on the one hand, and human temporality on the other. We will analyze how the different media these scholars and artists scrutinize (sound, moving image, literature, performance) are related to different approaches towards mediated, embodied, and experienced time, as well as towards natural, human, and technological concepts of time.