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Performing Robots Conference: Dialogues Between Theatre and Robotics

23-25 May 2019, Utrecht (the Netherlands) | Organized by Transmission in Motion (Utrecht University) and SPRING Performing Arts Festival
This conference takes stock of interactions between theatre and robotics so far and looks at possibilities for future collaboration. What do the performing arts have to offer as inspiration, model, and test-case for the development of robots and for human-robot interaction? How might collaboration between the performing arts and robotics contribute to further development of social robots, as well as to critical understanding of what it will mean to be living with them?

Posthuman Knowledge(s)

Utrecht Summer School course by Prof. Rosi Braidotti August 19-23, 2019 In 2019, Braidotti’s intensive course will focus on “Posthuman Knowledge(s)”. The aim of the course is to offer a critical overview of contemporary debates about the implications of the ‘posthuman turn’, for knowledge production and research in the Posthumanities. Braidotti will apply her specific […]

Masterclass Ariella Azoulay (Brown University)

23 Nov 2018 | Tropenmuseum
The Research Center for Material Culture is pleased to invite you to a masterclass with Professor Azoulay, one of the leading photo theorists today. Azoulays work explores questions around photographic theory, archival practices in relation to issues of sovereignty, political subjectivity and human rights. Professor Azoulay will speak on the theme potential history, a concept and an approach that she has developed over the last decade, which has far-reaching implications for the fields of political theory, archival formations and photography studies

The Politics of Depression. A critical analysis of the political-epistemological limits of major depressive disorder

Joe van der Eerden | University of Amsterdam
According to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately 6.7% of adults in the United States suffered from a major depressive episode in 2014. The goal of this research will be to argue that this prevalence of depression should be understood as a function of the operation of contemporary knowledge about depression, and of the normative forces that underlie, and arise from, this knowledge.