Netherlands Institute for Cultural Analysis (NICA) http://www.nica-institute.com Wed, 24 May 2017 07:13:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 LGBT-refugees: a critical perspective http://www.nica-institute.com/lgbt-refugees-a-critical-perspective/ Wed, 24 May 2017 06:57:24 +0000 http://www.nica-institute.com/?p=5057 Join us on June 6th for the Riek Stienstra lecture on LGBTQI+ refugees. Key speakers include Hakeem (Uganda Gay on Move), who will talk about his experiences with the asylum procedure, and Nassr Eddine Errami, human rights activist and Queer

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Invitation for the Riek Stienstra lecture

Date: 6 June 2017
Time: 18.30 – 22.00
Location: Universiteit van Amsterdam, room REC C0.01, building REC C, Roetersstraat 11, Amsterdam

Join us on June 6th for the Riek Stienstra lecture on LGBTQI+ refugees. Key speakers include Hakeem (Uganda Gay on Move), who will talk about his experiences with the asylum procedure, and Nassr Eddine Errami, human rights activist and Queer Muslim theologian, who will speak about  pinkwashing of LGBTQ refugees and asylumseekers. An expert panel moderated by Amna Durrani will discuss current themes such as safety in refugee shelters, the asylum procedure, and homonationalism. Because of Ramadan, there will be food and drinks afterwards in ‘De Krater’. The lecture will be in English.

Many refugees are limited in their ability to travel because of financial barriers. Do you want to help someone out by covering their train ticket? Then please consider donating to Queer Welfare Foundation. Donations are welcome in this account: NL28ABNA0589184458, F.A.M. Joemmanbaks , under ‘Treinkaartje Riek Stienstra’.

Find more information about the location here and here.

RSVP! Please let us know if you are attending by using this link: https://tinyurl.com/mux6d62

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1866815230232689/

 

The Riek Stienstralezing is organised by Queer Welfare, Secret Garden, COC the Netherlands en VUmc, department of Medical Humanities.

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John Lysaker & Paul Lysaker: Disordered Self http://www.nica-institute.com/john-lysaker-paul-lysaker-disordered-self/ Mon, 22 May 2017 14:08:19 +0000 http://www.nica-institute.com/?p=5052 Public lecture, May 31 | How can we approach self-experience, and how can we understand the disordered self? What are the conceptual and existential challenges of taking care of (or managing and directing) this disordered self? What can the humanities – or art and literature – tell us about mental illness, and how can we further develop theories of the self by building on experiences from clinical practice? During this special event, John Lysaker, Professor of Philosophy, and Paul Lysaker, Psychiatrist and Professor of Clinical Psychology, will tackle these and other questions.

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PUBLIC LECTURE EVENT

Thinking Through the Disordered Self: New Directions in the Dialogue between The Arts, Psychiatry and The Humanities

Two public lectures on art, self-experience and mental illness, by John Lysaker and Paul Lysaker

Registration required: please register by email through: gaston.franssen@uva.nl.
May 31st, 19:00-22:00, VOC hall, Bushuis/Oost-Indisch Huis, Kloveniersburgwal 48, Amsterdam

There is a long tradition of dialogue between the domain of the arts, the humanities and psychiatry – ranging from phenomenological approaches to mental illness, through narrative and creative therapy, to the medical humanities and neurophilosophy. After all, one of the fundamental questions of the humanities – what is it to be human? – often leads to questions about the self, mind and consciousness, and about what happens if these are affected by mental illness. With the current fascination for forms of ‘self-management’, ‘self-care’, or ‘self-direction’ in both psychosomatic medicine and psychiatry, the dialogue between the humanities and mental healthcare has shifted to the topic of ‘the self’ once again. How can we approach self-experience, and how can we understand the disordered self? What are the conceptual and existential challenges of taking care of (or managing and directing) this disordered self? What can the humanities – or art and literature – tell us about mental illness, and how can we further develop theories of the self by building on experiences from clinical practice? During this special event, John Lysaker, Professor  of Philosophy, and Paul Lysaker, Psychiatrist and Professor of Clinical Psychology, will tackle these and other questions. The event is bound to be of great interest to all master, research master, PhD students and academic staff members with interest in specifically psychiatry, (neuro)philosophy, psychology, narratology, literary studies, aesthetics, phenomenology, and art theory.

Programme:

19:00-19:40 Prof. John Lysaker: What Art Asks of Us

19:40-20:00 Q&A

20:00-20:40 Prof. Paul Lysaker: The Relevance of the Humanities to Clinical Practice

20:40-21:00 Q&A

Paul H. Lysaker is a clinical psychologist at the Roudebush VA Medical Center and a professor of clinical psychology at the Indiana University School of Medicine, department of psychiatry, Indianapolis Indiana. He received his doctorate in Psychology from Kent State University in 1991. His research interests include the psychological processes that affect recovery from serious mental illness, alterations in consciousness in disorders such as schizophrenia and the development of long term forms of psychotherapy focused on enhancing wellness for adults with psychosis. He is an author of over 330 peer reviewed papers on these and related subjects.

John Lysaker is Professor of Philosophy at Emory University. His work concerns human flourishing and whatever facilitates or frustrates its emergence. He works in philosophical psychology, the philosophy of art, and social philosophy, and primarily from the traditions of hermeneutic phenomenology, critical social theory, and American romanticism. He is the author of Poetry and the Birth of Sense (2002), Emerson & Self-Culture (2008) and the co-author, with Paul Lysaker, of Schizophrenia and the Fate of the Self (2008). Current projects include Where Do We Find Ourselves: Essays After Emerson, and Dear Glaucon: Finding Our Bearings with Artworks.

This workshop is an initiative of Gaston Franssen (University of Amsterdam) and Stefan van Geelen (University Medical Center Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital). In February-March 2017, they organized the interdisciplinary MA/RMA research tutorial ‘What Is It Like To Be A Patient: Stories in Medicine, Psychology and The Humanities’; for more information, follow this link; for a video impression of the tutorial, please follow this link as well as this link. The workshop is co-funded by the NWO research project “Management of the Self: a Humanities Approach to Self-Management in Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine”, carried out at the Radboud University Nijmegen, the University Medical Center Utrecht, the VU University Amsterdam, the Dimence Mental Healthcare Group and the University of Amsterdam. For more information, please email: Gaston Franssen (gaston.franssen@uva.nl) or Stefan van Geelen (s.m.vangeelen@umcutrecht.nl).

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Fashion and National Identity http://www.nica-institute.com/fashion-national-identity/ Mon, 22 May 2017 13:49:25 +0000 http://www.nica-institute.com/?p=5041 Seminar, June 19 | The central question of this seminar is the relation between fashion and national identity. Clothes have served in different ways to represent a nation, often in ambiguous and paradoxical ways. But what connects clothes to a nation: the designer’s nationality, the production of clothes, or what people wear? Historians, cultural scholars, museum curators and journalists reflect on how clothes reproduce, shape and question national identity.

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The Research Institute CLUE+, the Department of Arts & Culture, History and Antiquity, and the Netherlands Institute for Cultural Analysis cordially invite you to the afternoon seminar ‘Fashion and National Identity’ organized by Dr. Javier Gimeno-Martínez (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Prof. Dr. Anneke Smelik (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen), which will be held on Monday June 19, 2017, from 13:00 – 17:00 hrs. at Room 13A-33 (VU Main building, 13th floor).

‘Fashion and National Identity’

Date: June 19, 2017
Time: 13:00 to 17:00 (including reception)
Place: Lecture theater 13A-33, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Main building
Email: j.a.j.huijgen@student.vu.nl
Registration: There is no seminar fee, but you have to register for the conference. Registration deadline: June 12, 2017

The central question of this seminar is the relation between fashion and national identity. Clothes have served in different ways to represent a nation, often in ambiguous and paradoxical ways. But what connects clothes to a nation:  the designer’s nationality, the production of clothes, or what people wear? Historians, cultural scholars, museum curators and journalists reflect on how clothes reproduce, shape and question national identity.

Programme

13.00-13.10 Introduction by Anneke Smelik and Javier Gimeno-Martínez

13.10-13.30 Javier Gimeno-Martínez (VU)

‘Index, symbol, performance: connecting fashion and nation’

13.30-13.50 Sophie Elpers (Meertens Institute)

‘In search of the vernacular: a short introduction on national sentiments and everyday culture between the 19th and the 21st century’

13.50-4.10 Maaike Feitsma (AMFI-HvA)

‘Dressed in clogs and denim: branding the Dutch nation’

14.10-14.40 Discussion

14.40-15.00 COFFEE BREAK

15.00-15.20 Anneke Smelik (RU Nijmegen)

‘The paradoxes of Dutch fashion: local, global and glocal’

15.20-15.40 Madelief Hohé (Gemeentemuseum Den Haag)

‘Secret stories on Dutch Fashion from the Museum Archives: Gemeentemuseum Den Haag’

15.40-16.00 Milou van Rossum (modejournaliste)

‘A short history of five successful modern Dutch garments’

16.00-16.30 Discussion

16.30-17.00 DRINKS

 

 

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Digital Democracy: Critical Perspectives in the Age of Big Data http://www.nica-institute.com/digital-democracy-critical-perspectives-in-the-age-of-big-data/ Mon, 22 May 2017 13:16:26 +0000 http://www.nica-institute.com/?p=5035 10 & 11 November 2017 | The coordinates of democracy, civic engagement and political participation are being fundamentally reconfigured in the context of digital media, Big Data and algorithmic culture, and so too are the media industries. This joint conference of the ECREA Communication and Democracy and Media Industries and Cultural Production Sections provides the opportunity to analyse and assess these changes.

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Joint Conference of two ECREA Sections: Communication and Democracy; and Media Industries and Cultural Production

10 & 11 November 2017
Södertörn University, Stockholm
More information

Keynote speakers

  • Helen Kennedy (University of Sheffield)
  • Joseph Turow (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Mikkel Flyverbom (Copenhagen Business School)

The coordinates of democracy, civic engagement and political participation are being fundamentally reconfigured in the context of digital media, Big Data and algorithmic culture, and so too are the media industries. This joint conference of the ECREA Communication and Democracy and Media Industries and Cultural Production Sections provides the opportunity to analyse and assess these changes.

The constant need to measure and capture our behavior and attitudes has consequences for our political agency and subjectivities. What do big data and algorithmic culture mean in the context of democratic participation and engagement? What are the consequences of ubiquitous surveillance, preemptive policing and social bots for our understanding of democracy and exercise of civic rights? How do current discussions of political agency in the digital age compare to previous moments of disruption in terms of the introduction of media technologies?

Big data and issues related to algorithmic governance have become a major topic of enquiry in the context of media industries as well. ‘Legacy media’ are trying to respond by integrating new digital services with their existing ones and new data-driven journalistic and media production practices emerge. This presents policy challenges, as, for example, public service media need to adapt to a situation in which data is increasingly commercialized. There are implications too for media workers in this new moment. In this context, we wish to explore issues related to the integration of Big Data and the media industries as well as online production, creativity and digital labour.

During this section conference, we aim to engage with questions concerning datafication, media industries and (digital) democracy through addressing topics such as (but not limited to):

  • Political subjectivities and political agency in the age of Big Data
  • Political consequences of storing, processing and organizing of data
  • Civic engagement and political participation in times of Big Data
  • Surveillance and preemptive policing
  • Materiality and environmental issues of Big Data and algorithmic culture
  • New actors and discourses in the context of datafication
  • Democratic potential of Big Data and algorithmic culture
  • Algorithmic taste management in the media industries
  • Archives and archiving of cultural production and civic engagement
  • Media work and labour in datafied media industries
  • Data Journalism

YECREA workshop on Digital methods for studying algorithms: complicating the socio-technical relation is organized. More information here

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Connecting to the Masses: 100 Years from the Russian Revolution http://www.nica-institute.com/connecting-to-the-masses-100-years-from-the-russian-revolution/ Mon, 15 May 2017 12:04:02 +0000 http://www.nica-institute.com/?p=5012 Call for Abstracts
13 November 2017 | The relationship between governments and the people they govern has been always hostage to rhetoric, propaganda, and strategic public relations, as well as aggressive marketing and the influence of contemporary media industries, altering the dynamics of healthy political communications.

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From Agitprop to the Attention Economy

Call for Abstracts
November 13th, 2017 at the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam

The relationship between governments and the people they govern has been always hostage to rhetoric, propaganda, and strategic public relations, as well as aggressive marketing and the influence of contemporary media industries, altering the dynamics of healthy political communications. Often, this relationship has thrived on charismatic leaders, the “avant-garde”, who could feel the pulse of their population’s grievances, demands and hopes for the future. Whether the Russian revolution of 1917 is interpreted as a product of class struggle, as an event governed by historic laws predetermined by the alienation of the masses by monopoly industrial capitalism, or as a violent coup by a proto-totalitarian Bolshevik party, the Russian revolutionaries understood and connected to the masses in a way that the autocracy, bourgeois elites and reformists alike failed to do.

In the midst of rage, desperation and harsh everyday life conditions, due to the pressure and failures of WW1 against Germany, food shortages, growing poverty, inequality and alienation, the Bolsheviks felt the undercurrents in the seas of history and spoke to the people, exactly when the relationship between the Tsar and the population, and between the Provisional government and the Soviets were at a crucial tipping point. The Bolsheviks grasped the opportunity to change the world for themselves in the here and now, rather than waiting to reform in the future for their children. They did so violently and unapologetically with the effects of their move running through the Cold War and the confrontation with the West, all the way to the complex and intense relations between Russia and the United States, in terms of failed engagements of the past 25 years since the fall of the USSR, the first socialist state in the world.

Connecting to the masses is critical for the success of any movement, resurrection, protest, and revolution. The communication mechanisms for this connection have some times evolved and other times undergone revolutions of their own. Since the Russian centennial, scholars have examined how media and communication affects this connection to the masses in a double yet complimentary dynamic: how governments connect to the masses and how masses connect to their governments.

Therefore, we invite participants to debate this relationship and the strategies and lessons of “connecting to the masses”, in light of the development in media, technology and communication strategies over the last century.

Potential questions include: Is it still about charismatic leadership and movements that connect to the general population or has algorithmic communication intervened to amplify and commodity populist leaders, without bringing into fruition claims of digital democracy/reform or radical socio-political change? Are the social media protests we witness a flash in the pan or able to sustain movements, parties, organizations in the long durée? What communication and what technologies do contemporary movements need to advance their goals?

Areas the conference addresses are the following:

  • Evolution of propaganda: From leaflet bombs to Twitter
  • Artificial attention, political packaging and the so-called attention economy
  • Tactical media and tech activism in the 20th and 21st centuries
  • Strategies and lessons for the use of ICTs in mobilization
  • Impact of technology on revolutionary social change in the macro-perspective
  • Revolutionary-era media and communist rhetoric and transition to post-communism
  • Mediated contestation, surveillance, censorship and systems of control
  • From journalism to social media gatekeepers
  • Spheres and systems of political deliberation
  • Evolution of the ownership of means of communication, processes of labour reproduction in the media, culture and communication industries
  • (R)evolution of technology at work, digital labour, alternative production models
  • Intelligence and cyberespionage in the 100 years span.
  • Technosocial infrastructures and the politicization of health, illness and biopolitics.

Invited Participants*
Richard Aldrich, Anton Allahar, Franco Berardi, David Berry, Sebastien Broca, David Chandler, Cholpon Chotaeva, Cristiano Codagnone, Gabriella Coleman, Lina Dencik, Anastasia Denisova, Mats Fridlund, Myria Georgiou, Goodwin, Andrji Gorbachyk, Galina Gorborukova, Baruch Gottlieb, Jason Hughes, Arne Hintz, Gulnara Ibraeva, Anastasia Kavada, Olessia Koltsova, Garnet Kindervarter, Iliya Kiriya, Mathias Klang, Maros Krivy, Adi Kuntsman, Adele Lindenmeyr, Geert Lovink, Peter Lunt, Jacob Matthews, Dan Mercea, Galina Miazhevich, Peter Mihalyi, Gerassimos Moschonas, Phoebe Moore, Zenonas Norkus, Alex Neumann, Jonathan Ong, Tamás Pál, Despina Panagiotopoulou, Korina Patelis, Thomas Poell, Vincent Rouzé, Maria Rovisco, Paul Reilly, Ellen Rutten, Michael Schandorf, Markus Schultz, Nikos Smyrnaios, Serge Sych, Irina Tjurina, Marc Tuters, Giuseppe Veltri, Anastasia Veneti, Stefania Vicari, Alex Wood.

*To be updated as attendance is confirmed. Please follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/471967253135039/ and on Twitter (@cttm_conference) for regular updates.

The conference is organised through a collaboration between Athina Karatzogianni from the School of Media, Communication and Sociology of the University of Leicester; Stefania Milan from the DATACTIVE research group at the Media Studies department of the University of Amsterdam; Andrey Rezaev from the Department of Sociology at St. Petersburg State University; the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam; and the State Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki.

Please email abstracts (250w max) and/or any inquiries to Athina Karatzogianni athina.k@gmail.com by July 1st 2017 latest.

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